albrecht durer knight death and the devil tattoo

Albrecht durer knight death and the devil tattoo
For years, I searched for a tattoo artist who could capture the tension and delicacy of a D ü rer piece. I knew I wanted to be physically intertwined with Dürer , but could not find the right person with both the skill and emotional intensity to translate a genius’s work onto my body permanently. I knew the piece would require both technical finesse and gestural understanding.
Photograph by Max Eicke

With the invention of the print press, a second edition was produced in book form around 1511. Several copies of the book were produced and the message could reach a large number of people. The pictures of the 15 woodcuts appealed to the masses who found the subject matter meaningful as they believed it contained prophecy of end times.
This is a large print that is part of his three master engravings (Meisterstiche). The other two pieces are Saint Jerome in His study and Melancholia I. Though the trio don’t have similar themes like the Apocalypse pieces did, he used interrelated and complementary technique on them.

Albrecht durer knight death and the devil tattoo
Albrecht Dürer, German Renaissance painter and printmaker, was born on May 21,1471 in Nuremburg, one of the great European centers of art and commerce, is considered one of Northern Europe’s most influential artists.
Although a Northern European artist, he was drawn to the theory and art of contemporary Italian greats, including Raphael, Giovanni Bellini and Leonardo da Vinci. Deeply intellectual, he wrote books on art theory including Four Books of Human Proportion (1528), and Four Books on Measurement (1525), the first German book for adults on geometry.

Albrecht durer knight death and the devil tattoo
Tom Hück, printmaker
Electric Baloneyland is the provocative and larger-than-life centerpiece of Rival Cuts. The chiaroscuro woodcut triptych measures 86 x 108 inches, and though similar in technique to the work of Dürer, it is clearly heir to the satire of Daumier and R. Crumb, whom Hück also loves.

References:

http://www.albrechtdurer.org/apocalypse/
http://engage.pcad.edu/blog/artist-spotlight-albrecht-d%C3%BCrer
http://carlos.emory.edu/art-provocation-tom-huck-printmaker
http://totallyhistory.com/knight-death-and-the-devil/

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