did hades rape persephone

Did hades rape persephone
The Rape of Persephone” is a poem composed by Claudian circa 395 A.D.
Persephone, the daughter of Demeter and Zeus, is also known as Kore.
Without Demeter’s knowledge, Zeus promised Persephone to his brother Hades. While the young girl was picking flowers one day in the Sicilian countryside with her companions and carefree nymphs, she caught a glimpse of a beautiful narcissus which she approached and picked.
At this instant, the earth opened, and Hades came out of the crevasse on his chariot and kidnapped his niece.
Demeter, mad with grief because she did not know who had abducted her daughter, went out to find her and wandered around the world for nine days and nine nights. At the end of this period, the Sun, emotionally moved, told her the name of the abductor.
To get her revenge, Demeter leaves Olympus and prevents the growth of all plants on Earth. Worried for the future of the mortals, Zeus sends Hermes to the Underworld to find Persephone and bring her back to her mother under one condition: she had not eaten anything during her journey in the underworld. Hades, predicting Zeus’s ruse, gave his wife pomegranate seeds. Thus, he thought that he could keep Persephone.
However, the god was obliged to accept a compromise. Persephone would stay with him only six months of the year and with Demeter the other six months. This deity’s legend is easy to interpret. Persephone is trapped in the underworld just like grains of wheat buried underground in autumn and winter. It is also a view of death associated with the Greek religious practices known as the Eleusinian Mysteries.

THE RAPE OF PERSEPHONE was the tale of the abduction of the springtime goddess Persephone by Haides, king of the underworld.
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6. 21. 1 :
“At the foot of the hill [Olympia in Elis] has been built a sanctuary of Demeter surnamed Khamyne (Chamyne). Some are of opinion that the name is old, signifying that here the earth gaped (khanein) for the chariot of Haides and then closed up (mysai) once more . . . in place of the old images of Kore (the Maid) [Persephone] and of Demeter new ones of Pentelic marble were dedicated.”

Did hades rape persephone
This painting on a large wooden panel is entitled The Abduction of Proserpine. It was painted in 1570, and spent most of its life residing in the Villa Salviati after being commissioned by the Salviati family. [4]
This list is by no means exhaustive, but seeks to highlight some prominent examples of the myth in Western paintings.

Did hades rape persephone
“How many seeds did you eat, daughter?” he asked.
Down in the Underworld, Persephone was distraught. Hades was kind to her and showered her with gifts, but she missed her mother and the world above. Hades was saddened, but he was also patient. He put Persephone’s thrown right next to his and, unlike the other Gods, allowed her equal rule along side him. He treated her not as property, but as someone who could eventually become a friend. When Persephone suggested that another realm be made for the best mortal souls to go to, Hades made it for her. It was called Elysium–the Underworld’s heaven. Persephone felt conflicted. She missed her mother, but Hades was the only person who’d ever treated like an adult. She was beginning to fall in love with him.

In some versions, Ascalaphus informed the other deities that Persephone had eaten the pomegranate seeds. When Demeter and her daughter were reunited, the Earth flourished with vegetation and color, but for some months each year, when Persephone returned to the underworld, the earth once again became a barren realm. This is an origin story to explain the seasons.
In a Classical period text ascribed to Empedocles, c. 490–430 BC, [n 2] describing a correspondence among four deities and the classical elements, the name Nestis for water apparently refers to Persephone: “Now hear the fourfold roots of everything: enlivening Hera, Hades, shining Zeus. And Nestis, moistening mortal springs with tears.” [21]

References:

http://www.theoi.com/Khthonios/HaidesPersephone1.html
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_of_Persephone
http://sites.psu.edu/tetirclblog/2015/02/05/greek-mythology-hades-and-persephone/comment-page-1/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persephone
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Swing_(painting)

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