hughes teh rape of proserpina

Ovid’s Metamorphosis is a book that is challenging to classify. It was written in 8 AD, and though it is long enough to be considered an epic, it doesn’t have the same sense of cohesive narrative that many epic poems possess. Instead, the original manuscript is a collection of approximately 250 myths, written in verse, some of which span many pages while others are much shorter in length. The poems move in chronological order from the creation of the world to the coronation of Julius Caesar, with a focus on myth. Some of these myths are taken directly from other sources, but most are adaptations and re-imaginings of characters and stories, which Ovid adapted for his own purposes. Tales from Ovid takes this behemoth work of 250 myths and cuts it down by one-tenth, sharing Hughes’ favorite sections in a new work of translation.
Other stories include Echo and Narcissus, the story of the hunter who loved his own reflection too much, and the nymph who fell in love with him. Narcissus ignored Echo because he only loved himself, and eventually all that was left of Echo was her voice. Hughes also includes a translation of the story of Arachne, the woman who turned into a spider, and Midas, the king who was so greedy he turned everything he loved, even his family, into gold. Each story tells of transformation, but also of the pains and dangers of love.

Hughes teh rape of proserpina
Ceres, goddess of the harvest had a daughter fathered by Jove, and the girl’s name was Proserpine. When Pluto, god of the underworld, had come up to earth, Cupid’s arrow instilled love for Proserpine in his heart. The king of Hades kidnapped the girl from the field she played in, and he took her, unwillingly, to the Underworld.
Ceres looked everywhere for her daughter, but no one knew where to find Proserpine until she came to Cyane’s pool and saw Proserpine’s scarf floating on the water. Furious that no one could help her, Ceres began to destroy the crops of Sicily, where she had discovered her daughter’s scarf. Then another water nymph helped her. Arethusa told Ceres that she had come to Sicily from her homeland, and she had traveled through the Underworld to get there. While she had been part of the river Styx that flows through Hades, she had seen Proserpine below as the Queen of Hell.

Hughes teh rape of proserpina
Cyane, a water nymph who pitied Proserpine, tried to block Pluto’s entrance to the Underworld, but he used his powers to make a hole in the earth and descend to his realm despite her. Cyane was so sad for Proserpine and so hurt that the glade around her stream had been violated that she cried herself away and dissolved into her own pool.
Ceres, goddess of the harvest had a daughter fathered by Jove, and the girl’s name was Proserpine. When Pluto, god of the underworld, had come up to earth, Cupid’s arrow instilled love for Proserpine in his heart. The king of Hades kidnapped the girl from the field she played in, and he took her, unwillingly, to the Underworld.

Hughes was a younger son of John Hughes, clerk in the Hand-in-Hand Fire Office, Snow Hill, London, and his wife Anne Burges, daughter of Isaac Burges of Wiltshire. He was the younger brother of John Hughes. [1]
and several novels from the Spanish of Cervantes, which were published anonymously in Samuel Croxall’s ‘Select Collection of Novels and Histories’ (second edition, London, 1729, six vols.)

Ovid was a Roman poet who lived and worked during the reign of the emperor Augustus. He is widely considered one of the top three canonical Roman poets, along with Virgil and Horace. He wrote many works, but his most famous was the Metamorphosis, which was considered his magnum opus. He was very popular until he was suddenly and mysteriously exiled by the emperor, and forced to live his final years on the Black Sea.
Tales from Ovid, like the original work from which it is drawn, has two major themes; change, or metamorphosis, and love. Many of the stories are violent, and depict love as both a beautiful and an infinitely harmful power. In each myth, there is a significant change in form, whether it be the metamorphosis of one character into another body or figure, a landscape, or some other sudden, miraculous physical shift. These shifts often provide resolution or closure, as in stories where women, pursued by attackers, transform into birds, trees, or other creatures in order to avoid being raped.

References:

http://www.bookrags.com/notes/met/part30.html
http://www.bookrags.com/notes/met/part30.html
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabez_Hughes
http://www.supersummary.com/tales-from-ovid/summary/
http://finemrespice.com/node/132

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *