ingres grand odalisque

Ingres grand odalisque

For more about the impact of Ingres’ art on twentieth century artists, see: Classical Revival in modern art (1900-30).

• Death of Marat (1793) by Jacques-Louis David.

Ingres grand odalisque
The painting was commissioned by Napoleon’s sister, Queen Caroline Murat of Naples, [1] and finished in 1814. [2] Ingres drew upon works such as Dresden Venus by Giorgione, and Titian’s Venus of Urbino as inspiration for his reclining nude figure, though the actual pose of a reclining figure looking back over her shoulder is directly drawn from the 1800 Portrait of Madame Récamier by Jacques-Louis David.
Stemming from the initial criticism the painting received, the figure in Grande Odalisque is thought to be drawn with “two or three vertebrae too many.” [1] [6] Critics at the time believed the elongations to be errors on the part of Ingres, but recent studies show the elongations to have been deliberate distortions. [7] Measurements taken on the proportions of real women showed that Ingres’s figure was drawn with a curvature of the spine and rotation of the pelvis impossible to replicate. [6] It also showed the left arm of the odalisque is shorter than the right. The study concluded that the figure was longer by five instead of two or three vertebrae and that the excess affected the lengths of the pelvis and lower back instead of merely the lumbar region. [6]

Ingres grand odalisque
It is apparent that critics of his day were not ready for Ingres’ vivid, erotic imagination. The artist’s use of long lines to convey curvature and sensuality caused Ingres’ work to be criticized until the mid 1820s.
La Grande Odalisque

Ingres grand odalisque
La Grande Odalisque,
Author(s):
De Vergnette François

Ingres grand odalisque
Given how the duty of concubines was merely to satisfy the carnal pleasures of the sultan, this elongation of her pelvic area may have been a symbolic distortion by Ingres. While this may represent sensuous feminine beauty, her gaze, on the other hand, has been said to “[reflect] a complex psychological make-up” or “[betray] no feeling”. In addition, the distance between her gaze and her pelvic region may be a physical representation of the depth of thought and complex emotions of a woman’s thoughts and feelings.
Ingres portrays a concubine in languid pose as seen from behind with distorted proportions. The small head, elongated limbs, and cool color scheme all reveal influences from Mannerists such as Parmigianino, whose Madonna with the Long Neck was also famous for anatomical distortion.

References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grande_Odalisque
http://www.artble.com/artists/jean_auguste_dominique_ingres/paintings/la_grande_odalisque
http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/une-odalisque
http://www.wikiart.org/en/jean-auguste-dominique-ingres/the-grande-odalisque-1814
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grande_Odalisque

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