la grande odalisque jean auguste ingres

La grande odalisque jean auguste ingres

La Grande Odalisque (1814) by J.A.D. Ingres.
Regarded as one of the greatest modern paintings of the 19th century.
The painting includes several typical devices used by Ingres. Notice, for example, the lack of illusionary depth in the picture which focuses attention on the figure. She herself is, as usual, created with long, sinuous lines, while her skin is bathed in a diffused soft light, with none of the exaggerated chiaroscuro championed by Caravaggio (1573-1610) and his supporters. And as usual, the artist demonstrates his exceptional skill in rendering the different fabrics and surfaces, as well as the fine details of the turban, fan and curtains.

La grande odalisque jean auguste ingres
This eclectic mix of styles, combining classical form with Romantic themes, prompted harsh criticism when it was first shown in 1814. Critics viewed Ingres as a rebel against the contemporary style of form and content. When the painting was first shown in the Salon of 1819, one critic remarked that the work had “neither bones nor muscle, neither blood, nor life, nor relief, indeed nothing that constitutes imitation”. [4] This echoed the general view that Ingres had disregarded anatomical realism. [5] Ingres instead favored long lines to convey curvature and sensuality, as well as abundant, even light to tone down the volume. [5] Ingres continued to be criticized for his work until the mid-1820s. [3]
The painting was commissioned by Napoleon’s sister, Queen Caroline Murat of Naples, [1] and finished in 1814. [2] Ingres drew upon works such as Dresden Venus by Giorgione, and Titian’s Venus of Urbino as inspiration for his reclining nude figure, though the actual pose of a reclining figure looking back over her shoulder is directly drawn from the 1800 Portrait of Madame Récamier by Jacques-Louis David.

La grande odalisque jean auguste ingres
La Grande Odalisque,
© 2005 Musée du Louvre / Angèle Dequier

La grande odalisque jean auguste ingres
Use of Color:
Under the classical training of David, Ingres was taught to focus more on drawing than on color. Though he paid meticulous attention to the details of the line, his use of colors is also carefully planned. He contrasts the warm tones of the nude’s skin against the cool colored silk she lies on.
Both women are propped up against their left arms while their right arms lie across their bodies. The position of their feet is slightly different; the odalisque’s left foot is further away from her right than in Madame Récamier. The major difference comes when Ingres adds his own personal touch; anatomical distortions. David portrays a female form truer to nature.

La grande odalisque jean auguste ingres
Ingres portrays a concubine in languid pose as seen from behind with distorted proportions. The small head, elongated limbs, and cool color scheme all reveal influences from Mannerists such as Parmigianino, whose Madonna with the Long Neck was also famous for anatomical distortion.
Stemming from the initial criticism the painting received, the figure in Grande Odalisque is thought to be drawn with “two or three vertebrae too many.” Critics at the time believed the elongations to be errors on the part of Ingres, but recent studies show the elongations to have been deliberate distortions. Measurements taken on the proportions of real women showed that Ingres’s figure was drawn with a curvature of the spine and rotation of the pelvis impossible to replicate. It also showed the left arm of the odalisque is shorter than the right. The study concluded that the figure was longer by five instead of two or three vertebrae and that the excess affected the lengths of the pelvis and lower back instead of merely the lumbar region.

References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grande_Odalisque
http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/une-odalisque
http://www.artble.com/artists/jean_auguste_dominique_ingres/paintings/la_grande_odalisque
http://www.wikiart.org/en/jean-auguste-dominique-ingres/the-grande-odalisque-1814
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/paintings-analysis/grande-odalisque.htm

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