michaelangelo la pieta

Michaelangelo la pieta
Christ’s face does not reveal signs of the Passion. Michelangelo did not want his version of the Pietà to represent death, but rather to show the “religious vision of abandonment and a serene face of the Son,” [5] [ better source needed ] thus the representation of the communion between man and God by the sanctification through Christ.

Do you not know that chaste women stay fresh much more than those who are not chaste? How much more in the case of the Virgin, who had never experienced the least lascivious desire that might change her body? [7]

Michaelangelo la pieta
As for proof that this is definitely an undertaking worth 20 hours of your time, we’ll let the previous students speak for themselves: From 3731 ratings, the course averages 4.9 out of 5 stars.
While Dalí is considered a Surrealist, his fellow Surrealists—many of them communists—tried to expel him from their movement early in his career over his fascist sympathies. In 1934, the “father of Surrealism,” writer André Breton, called members of the movement to his apartment in Paris. His order against the painter read: “Dalí having been found guilty on several occasions of counterrevolutionary actions involving the glorification of Hitlerian fascism, the undersigned propose that he be excluded from surrealism as a fascist element and combated by all available means.”

Michaelangelo la pieta
This was the only work of Michelangelo to which he signed his name.

Here is perfect sweetness in the expression of the head, harmony in the joints and attachments of the arms, legs, and trunk, and the pulses and veins so wrought, that in truth Wonder herself must marvel that the hand of a craftsman should have been able to execute so divinely and so perfectly, in so short a time, a work so admirable; and it is certainly a miracle that a stone without any shape at the beginning should ever have been reduced to such perfection as Nature is scarcely able to create in the flesh. Such were Michelagnolo’s love and zeal together in this work, that he left his name a thing that he never did again in any other work written across a girdle that encircles the bosom of Our Lady. And the reason was that one day Michelagnolo, entering the place where it was set up, found there a great number of strangers from Lombardy, who were praising it highly, and one of them asked one of the others who had done it, and he answered, “Our Gobbo from Milan.” Michelagnolo stood silent, but thought it something strange that his labors should be attributed to another; and one night he shut himself in there, and, having brought a little light and his chisels, carved his name upon it.
Vasari’s Lives of the Artists

Michaelangelo la pieta
The Pietà was a popular subject among northern european artists. It means Pity or Compassion, and represents Mary sorrowfully contemplating the dead body of her son which she holds on her lap. This sculpture was commissioned by a French Cardinal living in Rome.
Look closely and see how Michelangelo made marble seem like flesh, and look at those complicated folds of drapery. It is important here to remember how sculpture is made. It was a messy, rather loud process (which is one of the reasons that Leonardo claimed that painting was superior to sculpture!). Just like painters often mixed their own paint, Michelangelo forged many of his own tools, and often participated in the quarrying of his marble — a dangerous job.
When we look at the extraordinary representation of the human body here we remember that Michelangelo, like Leonardo before him, had dissected cadavers to understand how the body worked.

Michaelangelo la pieta
Michelangelo took great care in sculpting La Pietà’s elaborate detail from a simple block of marble. Even more impressive, Michelangelo finished the sculpture in a year. Michelangelo designed La Pietà with a pyramidal structure in mind. Mary’s head serves as the vertex of the pyramid and the statue gradually widens to its base. Most notably, Michelangelo portrayed a young and beautiful Mary as opposed to traditional depictions of an older Mary grieving over Jesus.
La Pietà was featured at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York. The statue was shipped overseas protected by a 4,900-pound plexiglass case.

References:

http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/63602/15-things-you-should-know-about-michelangelos-pieta
http://www.italianrenaissance.org/michelangelos-pieta/
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JbWGusfynCw
http://thetourguy.com/travel-blog/la-pieta-michelangelos-first-roman-masterpiece/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piet%C3%A0_(Michelangelo)

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