socrates and plato painting

Socrates and plato painting
Other reproductions include: in Königsberg Cathedral, Kaliningrad by Neide, [26] in the University of North Carolina at Asheville’s Highsmith University Student Union, and a recent one in the seminar room at Baylor University’s Brooks College. A copy of Raphael’s School of Athens was painted on the wall of the ceremonial stairwell that leads to the famous, main-floor reading room of the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris.
The main arch, above the characters, shows a meander (also known as a Greek fret or Greek key design), a design using continuous lines that repeat in a “series of rectangular bends” which originated on pottery of the Greek Geometric period and then become widely used in ancient Greek architectural friezes. [12]

Socrates and plato painting
David uses color to highlight the emotion in this painting. The shades of red are more muted on the edges of the painting and become more vibrant in the center, culminating in the dark red robe of the man holding the cup of poison, generally taken as offering the cup to Socrates rather than receiving it after Socrates had consumed its contents. The only two serene men, Socrates and Plato, are garbed in a contrasting bluish-white. The more muted color scheme of this painting may be a response to critics of David’s Oath of the Horatii, who called his colors “garish”. [1]
Although he consulted Father Adry, a scholar on the subject, David’s depiction of Socrates death contains many historical inaccuracies. For simplicity, he removed many characters originally described in the dialogues of Plato. However, he included Apollodorus, the man leaning against the wall just within the arch, even though he is said to have been sent away by Socrates for displaying too much grief. David also historically misrepresented the ages of many of the pupils of Socrates, including Plato. Plato would have been a young man at the time of Socrates’s death, but in this painting he is the old man sitting at the foot of the bed. Even the face of Socrates is much more idealized than the classical bust that is typically used as a reference portrait of Socrates. [1] This underlines that Socrates life is projected out of Plato’s mind, whereas the old Plato idealises Socrates. Thus, the painting can rather be seen as an analysis than a failed historic depiction. [ citation needed ]

Socrates and plato painting
Modern reproductions of the fresco abound. For example, a full-size one can be seen in the auditorium of Old Cabell Hall at the University of Virginia. Produced in 1902 by George W. Breck to replace an older reproduction that was destroyed in a fire in 1895, it is four inches off scale from the original, because the Vatican would not allow identical reproductions of its art works. [25]
The main arch, above the characters, shows a meander (also known as a Greek fret or Greek key design), a design using continuous lines that repeat in a “series of rectangular bends” which originated on pottery of the Greek Geometric period and then become widely used in ancient Greek architectural friezes. [12]

Socrates and plato painting
Scholars argue that this divide in philosophies, placed at the center of The School of Athens, is the core theme of the painting.
Conversely, Aristotle’s hand is a visual representation of his belief that knowledge comes from experience. Empiricism, as it is known, theorizes that humans must have concrete evidence to support their ideas and is very much grounded in the physical world.

Socrates and plato painting
With these contrasting images of Socrates in mind–the philosopher arguing in the marketplace and the philosopher contemplating his own soul–let us treat them as stand-ins for the different characters of Socrates found in the early and middle dialogues (leaving the later dialogues for later.)
Socrates & Alcibiades? Or…?

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Death_of_Socrates
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_School_of_Athens
http://mymodernmet.com/school-of-athens-raphael/
http://pigsatisfied.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/wheres-socrates/
http://quizlet.com/131641621/cwv-topic-6-flash-cards/

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