starry night van gogh analysis

Starry night van gogh analysis
The first thing that I noticed was the overwhelming night sky, which takes up most of the background. Its swirling, flowing lines appear to be swishing across the background in this gentle, wavy motion and seem to be merging at the centre to form this spiral-like formation. Eleven fiery yellow stars that look like huge fireballs illuminate this whole piece and contrast with the cool blue, fluid night sky that takes on an amazing variety of shades of blue and grey. There is also the crescent moon at the top right hand corner that radiates a more orange, brighter light from the rest of the stars. The view of the night sky and village is partially blocked by this huge cypress bush in the foreground. It has this writhing quality to it and its black green colouring stands out to the rest of the relatively pastel piece. The houses are tiny and inconspicuously painted in the bottom right corner of the painting and blend in quite well with the forest and mountains. The architecture of the village is quaint and simple and no light illuminates the village, giving the impression that everyone there is probably asleep. In general, his brush strokes are heavy and thick and have this insistent, hectic rhythm to it. As a result, this painting has an illusion of constantly being in motion.
An Analysis on Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night

Starry night van gogh analysis
7) Research has confirmed that the dominant morning star in the painting is actually Venus, which was in a similar position at the time Van Gogh was working on “Starry Night,” and it would have shone brightly, just as Van Gogh painted it.
Interpretations of this painting are legion. Some claim it is a perfectly realistic account of the position of the stars in June 1889. This, needless to say, is perfectly possible. But the twisting, spiralling lines have nothing to do with the Northern Lights or the Milky Way or some spiral nebula or other. Others say that van Gogh was expressing a personal Gethsemane; they back this up by referring to the discussion of Christ on the Mount of Olives that he was currently engaged in, in his correspondence with Gauguin and Bernard. This too may be so; it is possible that premonitions of sufferings to come are articulated in the picture. But Biblical allegory is present throughout van Gogh’s oeuvre, and he had no need of a special motif, least of all a starry sky, with all its associations of Arles and Utopian visions. Rather, van Gogh was trying to summarize; and his resume juxtaposed natural, scientific, philosophical and personal elements. Starry Night is an attempt to express a state of shock, and the cypresses, olive trees and mountains had acted as van Gogh’s catalyst. More intensely, perhaps, than ever before, van Gogh was interested in the material actuality of his motifs as much as in their symbolic dimensions.

Starry night van gogh analysis
Vincent van Gogh painted Starry Night in 1889 during his stay at the asylum of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole near Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. Van Gogh lived well in the hospital; he was allowed more freedoms than any of the other patients. If attended, he could leave the hospital grounds; he was allowed to paint, read, and withdraw into his own room. He was even given a studio. While he suffered from the occasional relapse into paranoia and fits – officially he had been diagnosed with epileptic fits – it seemed his mental health was recovering.
Unfortunately, he relapsed. He began to suffer hallucination and have thoughts of suicide as he plunged into depression. Accordingly, there was a tonal shift in his work. He returned to incorporating the darker colors from the beginning of his career and Starry Night is a wonderful example of that shift. Blue dominates the painting, blending hills into the sky. The little village lays at the base in the painting in browns, greys, and blues. Even though each building is clearly outlined in black, the yellow and white of the stars and the moon stand out against the sky, drawing the eyes to the sky. They are the big attention grabber of the painting.
Starry Night is one of the most recognized pieces of art in the world. It is absolutely everywhere, too. It can be seen on coffee, mugs, t-shirts, towels, magnets, etc. Honestly, it sometimes feels as if the painting’s fame has exceeded that of its creator. It is a magnificent piece of art. That Starry Night resonates with so many people is a testament to how its beauty is timeless and universal.

Starry night van gogh analysis
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Starry night van gogh analysis
This blog will evaluate the different interpretations of Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night, including some of the history of the dutch post-impressionist painter who has become one of the most influential figures in western history and is perhaps most famous for his Starry Night. Which was painted a year before Van Gogh died in 1890, Auvers-sur-Oise, France. Van Gogh mainly painted locations with personal meaning and were familiar to him.
The cypress tree in Starry Night is the most eye-catching element of the painting but also the most ambiguous part, mostly because of its size and it’s dark and sinister presence contrasting heavily with brightly coloured stars. Starry Night was painted during a sad period in Van Gogh’s life making it unsurprising that the artist identified with the emotions of the cypress tree. The form and colours of the cypresses in Starry Night are inconsistent with the cypresses Gogh has painted before. In Van Gogh’s painting of Wheatfield with cypresses, the trees are brighter like the rest of the painting and are set during the day. This makes them more visible but still have a massiveness to them. Van Gogh also paints cypresses in pairs which is uncommon of cypress trees which may depict how his mind and mental health are uncharacteristically together compared to other’s minds. The brushstrokes are largely unbroken, long and unrefined which creates a bridge between the sky, cypress trees and the town.

References:

http://www.vincentvangogh.org/starry-night.jsp
http://www.vangoghgallery.com/painting/starry-night.html
http://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/vincent-van-gogh-the-starry-night-1889/
http://medium.com/@raphaeladowdinggreen/an-evaluation-of-the-interpretations-of-vincent-van-goghs-starry-night-cf1352edd589
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starry_Night_Over_the_Rh%C3%B4ne

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