the ecstacy of st.theresa

The ecstacy of st.theresa
“The pain was so sharp that it made me utter several moans; and so excessive was the sweetness caused me by this intense pain that one can never wish it to cease, nor will one’s soul be content with anything less than God.”
“Could there be a more felicitous portent for marital bliss?” asks Poundstone.

1999’s In Dust 3 featured Muchow and the actress Kateřina Winterová on 11 tracks of laptop-pop and post rock ambience. As opposed to the pastoral feel and dubby continuous mix of Free-D, this album consisted of pop songs voiced by actress-singer Winterová backed by the electro-acoustic soundscapes of Muchow. This downtempo sample-infused style was further pursued on 2003’s Slowthinking album released with an accompanying Fastmoving/Slowthinking DVD featuring the single I’m (Not Really) Optimistic. [ citation needed ]
The Ecstasy of Saint Theresa was a Czech alternative rock band, formed in 1990 by Jan Muchow, Jan Gregar, Petr Wegner and Irna Libowitz. [1] Early shoegaze influences included Siouxsie and the Banshees, Cocteau Twins, and My Bloody Valentine.

The ecstacy of st.theresa

Note: In creating his Ecstasy of Saint Teresa it is almost certain that Bernini made use of styles initiated by certain Mannerist artists. For example, we can see the basis for Bernini’s masterpiece in the simple piety, floating drapery and heavenward gaze of the Beata Michelina (1606, Pinacoteca Vaticana, Rome), a painting by the influential Mannerist religious painter Federico Barocci (1526-1612).

• Francesco Mochi (1580-1654)
First Baroque sculptor; on a par with Caravaggio and Carracci.

The ecstacy of st.theresa

I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it. The soul is satisfied now with nothing less than God. The pain is not bodily, but spiritual; though the body has its share in it. It is a caressing of love so sweet which now takes place between the soul and God, that I pray God of His goodness to make him experience it who may think that I am lying. [3]

The art historian Rudolf Wittkower wrote:

The ecstacy of st.theresa
A complete understanding of the aesthetic impact and spiritual significance of the Ecstasy can only be gained in the context of the larger space of the chapel. The work is, in fact, not an independent piece, but the crucial center of a more complex composition that brings together not only sculpture, but also painting and architecture—all designed by Bernini. The dark, patterned marble columns and convex niche in which the Ecstasyis framed, for example, enhance the brightness and dynamism of the scene, while giving the sense that the wall has opened up to reveal St. Teresa’s vision. We are, in a way, looking at a vision of a vision, one that Bernini has created for the faithful who worship at the altar and for the Cornaro family in particular. On each wall perpendicular to the altar wall, an illusionistic window contains sculptural likenesses of family members, some of whom lean over the parapet in the direction of Bernini’s work, rapt witnesses to the miracle.
Bernini’s sculptural group shows a cupid-like angel holding an arrow. His delicate touch and lithe figure give him an air of grace. With her head thrown back and eyes closed, Teresa herself collapses, overcome with the feeling of God’s love. Her physical body seems to have dematerialized beneath the heavy drapery of her robe. Twisting folds of fabric energize the scene and bronze rays, emanating from an unseen source, seem to rain down divine light. The combined effect is one of intense drama, the ethereality of which denies the true nature of the work of art. Despite being made of heavy marble, saint and angel—set upon a cloud—appear to float weightlessly.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ecstasy_of_Saint_Theresa_(band)
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/sculpture/ecstasy-of-saint-teresa.htm
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecstasy_of_Saint_Teresa
http://www.learner.org/series/art-through-time-a-global-view/dreams-and-visions/the-ecstasy-of-st-teresa/
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/sculpture/ecstasy-of-saint-teresa.htm

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