the ecstasy of st teresa brunelleschi

The ecstasy of st teresa brunelleschi
The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa (alternatively Saint Teresa in Ecstasy or Transverberation of Saint Teresa; in Italian: L’Estasi di Santa Teresa or Santa Teresa in estasi) is the central sculptural group in white marble set in an elevated aedicule in the Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome. It was designed and completed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, the leading sculptor of his day, who also designed the setting of the Chapel in marble, stucco and paint. It is generally considered to be one of the sculptural masterpieces of the High Roman Baroque. It depicts Teresa of Ávila.

I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it. The soul is satisfied now with nothing less than God. The pain is not bodily, but spiritual; though the body has its share in it. It is a caressing of love so sweet which now takes place between the soul and God, that I pray God of His goodness to make him experience it who may think that I am lying. [3]

The ecstasy of st teresa brunelleschi
One of my favorite examples of this idea is this ceiling of the San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane designed by Francesco Borromini.
For as long as I can remember, I have been in love with the Basilica di Santa Maria del Flore. Chop it up to my sister introducing me to the movie “A Room with A View” when I was young but I have always thought of it as one of the most beautiful buildings that I have ever seen in my life. We didn’t get the chance to go inside but just being in the presence of this building was amazing, each time I walked by it I had to stop and take pictures. Yes it is beautiful, the green, gold and pink of the design is gorgeous in person, and it Brunelleschi’s dome design is an important one in the study of Art History, but the most important element of this church was the connection it has to my sister. I have three older siblings who introduced me to different writers, music, and movies, leaving me with a very eclectic taste and an open mind. So not only was standing in front of this building the culmination of a life’s dream to experience it in person, but also reminded me of the connection to my siblings, whom I have missed terribly while being here in Scotland.

43. How did the status of the artist change from the 15 th to 16 th century?
40. What event caused Botticelli to destroy many of his paintings?

The ecstasy of st teresa brunelleschi
St Peter’s would have been –artistically- just another mammoth basilica, if it was not for ‎Michelangelo’s Dome, his Pieta, and Bernini’s imposing Baldacchino. The interior is, ‎nevertheless, one of the least inspiring places in Rome.‎
Standing at one of the highest viewpoints inside the Colosseum, I eventually noticed how it ‎resembled one huge sundial as the sun moved slowly, as if ashamed to shed light on the ‎horrific history of human brutality in this place.

At the Pantheon, apart from paying respects to Raphael in his resting place, one can visualize ‎how Brunelleschi once stood here with a dropping jaw as he contemplated a seemingly ‎impossible architectural feat. He had no idea people would experience the same awe gazing ‎at his own dome in Florence years later.‎

You can see many of the greatest hits of Italian art in a single day if you want to shuffle along behind everyone else at the Vatican, in Rome, but this is a recipe for Stendhal syndrome: an arguably psychosomatic but nonetheless debilitating malady, caused by exposing oneself to a large amount of sublime art all in one place.
Like Florence, Rome is a work of art in itself. The wanderer stumbles upon a mind-boggling Bernini at every turn, Caravaggio’s pieces hang about nonchalantly in unpretentious churches and Michelangelo’s great dome of St Peter’s watches over the whole head-spinning collection.

References:

http://kateloughran.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/sacred-spaces-and-revisiting-the-past-in-rome/
http://homework.sdmesa.edu/drogers/Art%20111/short%20essay%20exam%202.htm
http://camel76.wordpress.com/tag/bernini/
http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20120416-explore-italys-art-masterpieces
http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/the-ecstasy-of-saint-teresa

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