the pieta by michelangelo

Sadly, many of these have become damaged over time but Pieta remains in great condition and is a major attraction within the Italian cultural scene.
The concept of the Pieta was, in itself, not unique as there were many pietas in both German and French art. However, Michelangelo’s conceptualisation of the Pieta was unique for a number of reasons. He mixed Renaissance ideologies of classical beauty with naturalism but what set Michelangelo’s Pieta apart from all the others was that his was a multi-figured sculpture, considered a rarity in its day.

The pieta by michelangelo
Following completion, the Pietà’s first home was the Chapel of Santa Petronilla, a Roman mausoleum near the south transept of St. Peter’s, which the Cardinal chose as his funerary chapel. The chapel was later demolished by Bramante during his rebuilding of the basilica. According to Giorgio Vasari, shortly after the installation of his Pietà, Michelangelo overheard someone remark (or asked visitors about the sculptor) that it was the work of another sculptor, Cristoforo Solari, whereupon Michelangelo signed the sculpture. [8] Michelangelo carved MICHAELA[N]GELUS BONAROTUS FLORENTIN[US] FACIEBA[T] (Michelangelo Buonarroti, Florentine, made this) on the sash running across Mary’s chest. The signature echoes one used by the ancient Greek artists, Apelles and Polykleitos. It was the only work he ever signed. Vasari also reports the anecdote that Michelangelo later regretted his outburst of pride and swore never to sign another work of his hands. [9] [10]
When Michelangelo set out to create his Pietà, he wanted to create a work he described as “the heart’s image”. [6]

The pieta by michelangelo
Michelangelo claimed that the block of Carrara marble he used to work on this was the most “perfect” block he ever used, and he would go on to polish and refine this work more than any other statue he created.

Here is perfect sweetness in the expression of the head, harmony in the joints and attachments of the arms, legs, and trunk, and the pulses and veins so wrought, that in truth Wonder herself must marvel that the hand of a craftsman should have been able to execute so divinely and so perfectly, in so short a time, a work so admirable; and it is certainly a miracle that a stone without any shape at the beginning should ever have been reduced to such perfection as Nature is scarcely able to create in the flesh. Such were Michelagnolo’s love and zeal together in this work, that he left his name a thing that he never did again in any other work written across a girdle that encircles the bosom of Our Lady. And the reason was that one day Michelagnolo, entering the place where it was set up, found there a great number of strangers from Lombardy, who were praising it highly, and one of them asked one of the others who had done it, and he answered, “Our Gobbo from Milan.” Michelagnolo stood silent, but thought it something strange that his labors should be attributed to another; and one night he shut himself in there, and, having brought a little light and his chisels, carved his name upon it.
Vasari’s Lives of the Artists

The pieta by michelangelo
For centuries, the world has been captivated by the groundbreaking art of Michelangelo. Working in multiple mediums, the Italian artist was a true Renaissance man, culminating in an impressive collection of world-famous works that includes the Sistine Chapel ceiling, an iconic interpretation of David, and the Pietà, a monumental marble sculpture of the Madonna cradling Christ.
Stock Photos from Drop of Light/Shutterstock

The pieta by michelangelo
Dalí’s art doesn’t only appear in galleries and museums. He also did plenty of commercial work. (Fellow Surrealist André Breton nicknamed him “Avida Dollars,” or “eager for dollars.”) He created ads for De Beers Diamonds, S.C. Johnson & Company, Gap, and Datsun station wagons. (The Gap ad featured the tagline “Salvador Dalí wore khakis.”) Between 1938 and 1971, he created four covers for Vogue, and in 1945, one for Town & Country. In one example of his relentless self-promotion, he was even a celebrity spokesperson, shilling for brands like Alka-Seltzer and the French chocolate company Lanvin. Some of his commercial art endures today—you can still see his work in the Chupa Chups lollipop logo.
Thanks in part to putting his name in plain sight on the Pietà, Michelangelo’s reputation grew as the public’s love of the statue did. The artist lived to the age of 88, enjoying decades of acclaim and appreciation for his works.

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piet%C3%A0_(Michelangelo)
http://www.italianrenaissance.org/michelangelos-pieta/
http://mymodernmet.com/michelangelo-pieta/
http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/63602/15-things-you-should-know-about-michelangelos-pieta
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piet%C3%A0_(Michelangelo)

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