the starry night poem analysis

The starry night poem analysis
into that rushing beast of the night,
sucked up by that great dragon, to split
from my life with no flag,
no belly,
no cry.

This poem is inspired by Vincent Van Gogh’s famous painting Starry Night. It begins with a quote from a letter written by Van Gogh, which says that, despite himself, he has a deep, “terrible” need for religion, and that it is when he feels this need that he goes out and “paint[s] the stars”. I think there is something profound here about man’s need for something eternal and sacred. Though Van Gogh didn’t want religion in his life, he nevertheless had a need for the sacred. By creating art — by going out and painting the stars — Van Gogh was in effect immortalising the beauty of the world. He was acknowledging the transcendent power of beauty. Though he may not necessarily feel the presence of the Divine, a painter understands eternity, and s/he understands the holiness of beauty.

It moves. They are all alive.
Even the moon bulges in its orange irons
to push children, like a god, from its eye.
The old unseen serpent swallows up the stars.
Oh starry starry night! This is how
I want to die:
Still, everything around is full of life, even in this stillness of the night. Even the moon is alive changing it’s shape and color continuously. In fact the elements of the sky spinning and creating the twirling shapes in the painting are also a form of life and movement, a way for the painter to show everything’s moving around.

The starry night poem analysis
It moves. They are all alive.
Even the moon bulges in its orange irons
to push children, like a god, from its eye.
The old unseen serpent swallows up the stars.
Oh starry starry night! This is how
I want to die:
The town does not exist
except where one black haired tree slips
up like a drowned woman into the hot sky.
The town is silent. The night boils with eleven stars.
Oh starry starry night! This is how
I want to die.

It moves. They are all alive.
Even the moon bulges in its orange irons
to push children, like a god, from its eye.
The old unseen serpent swallows up the stars.
Oh starry starry night! This is how
I want to die:
THE POEM TO ME IS CONSIDERD TO BE A PLEA OF DEATH, HE SEES NO POINT OF LIVING, AFTER HOURS NO ONE CARES THAT HE EXISTS…ALL HE HAS TO DEPEND ON IS THE STARS AND THE DARK NIGHT. HE COULD COUNT ON THE MOON, BUT THE MOON HAS OTHER PRORITIES,AND HIS EXISTENCE IS NOT ONE.

The starry night poem analysis
The old unseen serpent swallows up the stars.

That does not keep me from having a terrible need of — shall I say the word — religion. Then
I go out at night to paint the stars
.

References:

http://www.yourfireshoes.com/the-starry-night-anne-sexton/
http://wordsmusicandstories.wordpress.com/2019/08/05/the-starry-night-2-analysis%F0%9F%8C%83/
http://www.americanpoems.com/poets/annesexton/the-starry-night/
http://www.eliteskills.com/analysis_poetry/The_Starry_Night_by_Anne_Sexton_analysis.php
http://www.theartpostblog.com/en/the-starry-night-by-van-gogh-what-it-represents/

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