wanderer above the sea of fog ad

Wanderer above the sea of fog ad
Some meaning of this work is lost in the translation of its title. In German, the title is “Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer”. Wanderer in German can mean either “wanderer” or “hiker”. [11]
The painting is composed of various elements from the Elbe Sandstone Mountains in Saxony and Bohemia, sketched in the field but in accordance with his usual practice, rearranged by Friedrich himself in the studio for the painting. In the background to the right is the Zirkelstein. The mountain in the background to the left could be either the Rosenberg or the Kaltenberg. The group of rocks in front of it represent the Gamrig near Rathen. The rocks on which the traveler stands are a group on the Kaiserkrone. [5]

Wanderer above the sea of fog ad
A man stands on top of a crag of rocks, overlooking a valley cloaked in mountain mist. Other ridges rise through the fog, giving the impression of islands in a sea.
The success of this painting, I think, lies in the possibility of this ambiguity: that a scene of such glory can also pose the threat of tragedy or personal alienation. What is he thinking as he stands there? It is impossible to tell.

Wanderer above the sea of fog ad
The Monk by the Sea is another Caspar David Friedrich painting made during the same period as the past few works on our list. Nevertheless, it takes an important place in his entire oeuvre since it marked the beginning of the artist’s international acclaim.
The first Friedrich painting on our top list is the iconic Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog (Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer) or Mountaineer in a Misty Landscape made by the artist in 1818. It is considered one of Friedrich’s most representative paintings and one of the masterpieces of Romanticism, now held at Kunsthalle Hamburg in Germany.

Wanderer above the sea of fog ad
In the middle of the composition, several other ridges similar to the one the wanderer himself stands upon, jut out from the mist.
He is wrapped in a dark green overcoat, and he holds a walking stick in his right hand for balance.

Wanderer above the sea of fog ad
Some meaning of this work is lost in the translation of its title. In German, the title is “Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer”. Wanderer in German can mean either “wanderer” or “hiker”.
Robert Macfarlane discusses the painting in terms of its significant influence on how mountain climbing has been viewed in the Western world since the Romantic era, calling it the “archetypical image of the mountain-climbing visionary”, and describing its power in representing the concept that standing on mountain tops is something to be admired, an idea which barely existed in earlier centuries.

References:

http://medium.com/thinksheet/how-to-read-paintings-wanderer-above-the-sea-of-fog-by-caspar-david-friedrich-b8c8f0e20d45
http://www.widewalls.ch/caspar-david-friedrich-paintings/
http://joyofmuseums.com/museums/europe/germany-museums/hamburg-museums/kunsthalle-hamburg/wanderer-above-the-sea-of-fog-by-caspar-david-friedrich/
http://www.wikiart.org/en/caspar-david-friedrich/the-wanderer-above-the-sea-of-fog
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer_above_the_Sea_of_Fog

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