what is a haywain

At the moment, they were on the lane that ran along the side of another great estate called Briareley Hall, a poundeddirt track studded with rocks like the raisins in a cake, wide enough for a hay wain pulled by two horses, with banks and hedgerows on either side that went well above Marina’s head even when she was in the saddle.
At the moment, they were on the lane that ran along the side of another great estate called Briareley Hall, a pounded dirt track studded with rocks like the raisins in a cake, wide enough for a hay wain pulled by two horses, with banks and hedgerows on either side that went well above Marina’s head even when she was in the saddle.

What is a haywain
It was considerably better received in France where it was praised by Théodore Géricault. The painting caused a sensation when it was exhibited with other works by Constable at the 1824 Paris Salon (it has been suggested that the inclusion of Constable’s paintings in the exhibition was a tribute to Géricault, who died early that year). In that exhibition, The Hay Wain was singled out for a gold medal awarded by Charles X of France, a cast of which is incorporated into the picture’s frame. The works by Constable in the exhibition inspired a new generation of French painters, including Eugène Delacroix. [ citation needed ]
Sold at the exhibition with three other Constables to the dealer John Arrowsmith, The Hay Wain was brought back to England by another dealer, D. T. White; he sold it to a Mr. Young who resided in Ryde on the Isle of Wight. It was there that the painting came to the attention of the collector Henry Vaughan and the painter Charles Robert Leslie. [6] On the death of his friend Mr. Young, Vaughan bought the painting from the former’s estate; in 1886 he presented it to the National Gallery in London, where it still hangs today. [7] In his will Vaughan bequeathed the full-scale oil sketch for The Hay Wain, made with a palette knife, to the South Kensington Museum (now the Victoria and Albert Museum). [8]

Although the painting evokes a Suffolk scene, it was created in the artist’s studio in London. Working from a number of open-air sketches made over several years, Constable then made a full-size preparatory oil sketch to establish the composition before painting the final picture.
Constable himself did not call this picture The Hay Wain – it was a nickname given to it by his friend Archdeacon Fisher. When it was sent to the Royal Academy in 1821 with its given title ’ Landscape: Noon ‘, it was greeted favourably by reviewers. The Examiner declared that it ’approaches nearer to the actual look of rural nature than any modern landscape whatever‘. However, it did not sell. Constable was probably unaware at the time that two French visitors to England – the artist Géricault and the writer Nodier – had seen his painting in the Royal Academy. According to Delacroix, Géricault returned to France ’quite stunned‘ by Constable’s picture. Nodier suggested that French artists should similarly look to nature rather than relying on journeys to Rome for inspiration (by this he meant emulating the classicising landscapes, painted by artists such as Claude).

What is a haywain
John Constable, A Study for ‘The Leaping Horse’ (detail), 1824-25. Museum no. 986-1900
It was at this point that he produced the large sketch, a full scale treatment of the subject but with the details only roughly indicated, the background merely blocked in and the predominant tone provided by the light brown canvas on which it is painted. By contrast, the full scale sketch of ‘The Leaping Horse’ is much more finished in both colour and detail. ‘The Haywain’ sketch really is an intermediary stage between the small sketch at Yale and the final version.

What is a haywain
“The Hay Wain” is probably Constable’s most famous work. It shows a typical rural scene in the River Stour, with two men driving an old hay wain. “There is nothing ugly; I never saw an ugly thing in my life (…) light, shade, and perspective will always make it beautiful”, said Constable, for whom the old and dilapidated wagon deserves as much attention as the mighty oaks on the left side of the painting.
John Constable is, along with J.M.W. Turner, the pinnacle of English landscape painting. Unlike Turner, who was an ambitious painter who traveled across Europe in search of new landscapes, Constable devoted all his efforts to depict the English countryside, without any artifice or idealization. Today, the area around Dedham Valley, Suffolk (where he painted most of his works) is sometimes called “Constable country. ”

References:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hay_Wain
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/john-constable-the-hay-wain
http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/s/constables-studies-for-the-hay-wain/
http://www.theartwolf.com/landscapes/constable-hay-wain.htm
http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/s/constables-studies-for-the-hay-wain/

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