what is the meaning of starry night

What is the meaning of starry night
The sky, the nature, the starry night satisfied his desire for infinity.

“I feel a tremendous need for religion, so I go outside at night to paint the stars”.

What is the meaning of starry night
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What is the meaning of starry night
Vincent van Gogh painted Starry Night in 1889 during his stay at the asylum of Saint-Paul-de-Mausole near Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. Van Gogh lived well in the hospital; he was allowed more freedoms than any of the other patients. If attended, he could leave the hospital grounds; he was allowed to paint, read, and withdraw into his own room. He was even given a studio. While he suffered from the occasional relapse into paranoia and fits – officially he had been diagnosed with epileptic fits – it seemed his mental health was recovering.
Unfortunately, he relapsed. He began to suffer hallucination and have thoughts of suicide as he plunged into depression. Accordingly, there was a tonal shift in his work. He returned to incorporating the darker colors from the beginning of his career and Starry Night is a wonderful example of that shift. Blue dominates the painting, blending hills into the sky. The little village lays at the base in the painting in browns, greys, and blues. Even though each building is clearly outlined in black, the yellow and white of the stars and the moon stand out against the sky, drawing the eyes to the sky. They are the big attention grabber of the painting.
Starry Night is one of the most recognized pieces of art in the world. It is absolutely everywhere, too. It can be seen on coffee, mugs, t-shirts, towels, magnets, etc. Honestly, it sometimes feels as if the painting’s fame has exceeded that of its creator. It is a magnificent piece of art. That Starry Night resonates with so many people is a testament to how its beauty is timeless and universal.

Some people have speculated about the eleven stars in the painting. While it’s true that Vincent didn’t have the same religious fervour in 1889, when he painted the work, as he did in his earlier years, there is a possibility that the story of Joseph in the Old Testament may have had an influence on the composition of the work.
Some people have made stylistic comparisons to Vincent’s other well known and equally turbulent work Wheatfield with Crows. Does the tumultuous style of these works reflect a tortured mind? Or is there something more we can read within the whorls Vincent’s raging night sky? This is what makes Starry Night not only Vincent’s most famous work, but also one of its most frequently interpreted in terms of its meaning and importance.

What is the meaning of starry night
The Moon is stylized, as astronomical records indicate that it actually was waning gibbous at the time Van Gogh painted the picture, [14] and even if the phase of the Moon had been its waning crescent at the time, Van Gogh’s Moon would not have been astronomically correct. (For other interpretations of the Moon, see below.) The one pictorial element that was definitely not visible from Van Gogh’s cell is the village, [21] which is based on a sketch F1541v made from a hillside above the village of Saint-Rémy. [3] Pickvance thought F1541v was done later, and the steeple more Dutch than Provençal, a conflation of several Van Gogh had painted and drawn in his Nuenen period, and thus the first of his “reminisces of the North” he was to paint and draw early the following year. [1] Hulsker thought a landscape on the reverse F1541r was also a study for the painting. [22]
While stopping short of calling the painting a hallucinatory vision, Naifeh and Smith discuss The Starry Night in the context of Van Gogh’s mental illness, which they identify as temporal lobe epilepsy, or latent epilepsy. [78] “Not the kind,” they write, “known since antiquity, that caused the limbs to jerk and the body to collapse (‘the falling sickness’, as it was sometimes called), but a mental epilepsy—a seizing up of the mind: a collapse of thought, perception, reason, and emotion that manifested itself entirely in the brain and often prompted bizarre, dramatic behavior.” [79] Symptoms of the seizures “resembled fireworks of electrical impulses in the brain.” [30]

References:

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/starry-night
http://www.vangoghgallery.com/painting/starry-night.html
http://www.vggallery.com/painting/p_0612.htm
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Starry_Night
http://www.theartpostblog.com/en/the-starry-night-by-van-gogh-what-it-represents/

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