what resources does poetry bring to the interpretation of van goghs the starry night

What resources does poetry bring to the interpretation of van goghs the starry night
Starry, starry night.
Flaming flowers that brightly blaze, Swirling clouds in violet haze,
Flaming Flowers – The Sunflower Series, Swirling Clouds – Starry Night
Reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue.
Colors changing hue, morning field of amber grain,
Field of Amber Grain – Wheat Field with Crows
Weathered faces lined in pain,
Weathered Faces: The Potato Eaters
Are soothed beneath the artist’s loving hand.
Now I understand
What you tried to say to me
How you suffered for your sanity
How you tried to set them free.
They would not listen
They did not know how
Perhaps they’ll listen now.

What resources does poetry bring to the interpretation of van goghs the starry night

use Internet searching techniques to find several inspiring art pieces.
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What resources does poetry bring to the interpretation of van goghs the starry night
3. Introduce students to the concept of ekphrastic poems and read examples. Students can use the analysis steps adapted from “Backing Into Ekphrasis” by Honor Moorman to make sense of the poem and the painting it was written in response to.

  • First person, speaking in the voice of one of the people, animals, plants, landscape features, or objects in the painting, or as the narrator viewing the painting. This can include a direct address to another person or thing in the painting, to the artist, or to the viewer.
  • Third person, as a narrator describing the larger action. This can include the viewer’s response to the art through description.

What resources does poetry bring to the interpretation of van goghs the starry night
This analysis is apt since McLean saw parallels between music and poetry. As he explained on the UK show Songbook,
2. Analyze ekphrastic poems inspired by Vincent van Gogh’s “The Starry Night.”

What resources does poetry bring to the interpretation of van goghs the starry night
The Starry Night was later examined thoroughly by the conservators from the museum and the Rochester Institute of Technology. The analysis showed that Van Gogh used ultramarine and cobalt blue to paint the sky and rare Indian yellow together with zinc yellow pigment for the moon and the stars.
The main curiosity surrounding this iconic painting is that the artist displayed different times of day and different weather conditions such as moonrise, sunrise, overcast days, windy days and a rainy day. Van Gogh usually made ink sketches on paper in his bedroom, since the hospital stuff banned him from doing it elsewhere. The unifying pictorial element of all those preparation works is the diagonal line coming from the right which lines the grandiose hills of the Alpilles mountains. Interestingly so, the cypress trees are represented in fifteen of the twenty-one versions beyond the wall enclosing the wheat field. Vincent meticulously depicted the view in six of these works by bringing the trees closer to the picture plane.

References:

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/ekphrasis-using-inspire-poetry-1093.html?tab=4
http://deyoung.famsf.org/curriculum/visual-analysis-across-genres-9-12th-grade
http://charlesmcquillen.com/teach-writers-ekphrastic-poetry-with-the-starry-night/
http://www.widewalls.ch/vincent-van-gogh-starry-night-painting/
http://www.vangoghgallery.com/painting/starry-night.html

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