where can donatello artwork be found

Where can donatello artwork be found
Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; c. 1386 – December 13, 1466) was a famous early Renaissance Italian artist and sculptor from Florence. He is, in part, known for his work in bas-relief, a form of shallow relief sculpture that, in Donatello’s case, incorporated significant 15th century developments in perspectival illusionism.
Siena

There are accounts by some historians that Donatello and Brunelleschi struck up a friendship around 1407 and traveled to Rome to study classical art. Details of the trip are not well known, but it is believed that the two artists gained valuable knowledge excavating the ruins of classical Rome. The experience gave Donatello a deep understanding of ornamentation and classic forms, important knowledge that would eventually change the face of 15th-century Italian art. His association with Brunelleschi likely influenced him in the Gothic style that can be seen in much of Donatello’s early work.
Donatello had nurtured a close and lucrative relationship with Cosimo de’ Medici in Florence. In 1430, the eminent art patron commissioned Donatello to do another statue of David, this time in bronze. This is probably Donatello’s most famous work. The sculpture is fully independent from any architectural surroundings that might support it. Standing a little over five feet tall, David represents an allegory of civic virtue triumphing over brutality and irrationality.

Where can donatello artwork be found
Donatello, original name in full Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi, (born c. 1386, Florence [Italy]—died December 13, 1466, Florence), master of sculpture in both marble and bronze, one of the greatest of all Italian Renaissance artists.
Donatello (diminutive of Donato) was the son of Niccolò di Betto Bardi, a Florentine wool carder. It is not known how he began his career, but it seems likely that he learned stone carving from one of the sculptors working for the cathedral of Florence (the Duomo) about 1400. Sometime between 1404 and 1407 he became a member of the workshop of Lorenzo Ghiberti, a sculptor in bronze who in 1402 had won the competition for the doors of the Baptistery. Donatello’s earliest work of which there is certain knowledge, a marble statue of David, shows an artistic debt to Ghiberti, who was then the leading Florentine exponent of International Gothic, a style of graceful, softly curved lines strongly influenced by northern European art. The David, originally intended for the cathedral, was moved in 1416 to the Palazzo Vecchio, the city hall, where it long stood as a civic-patriotic symbol, although from the 16th century on it was eclipsed by the gigantic David of Michelangelo, which served the same purpose. Still partly Gothic in style, other early works of Donatello are the impressive seated marble figure of St. John the Evangelist (1408–15) for the Florence cathedral facade and a wooden crucifix (1406–08) in the church of Santa Croce. The latter, according to an unproved anecdote, was made in friendly competition with Filippo Brunelleschi, a sculptor and a noted architect.

Where can donatello artwork be found
Some have perceived the David as having homo-erotic qualities, and have argued that this reflected the artist’s own orientation. [5] The historian Paul Strathern makes the claim that Donatello made no secret of his homosexuality, and that his behaviour was tolerated by his friends. [6] The main evidence comes from anecdotes by Angelo Poliziano in his “Detti piacevoli“, where he writes about Donatello surrounding himself with “handsome assistants” and chasing in search of one that had fled his workshop. [7] This may not be surprising in the context of attitudes prevailing in the 15th- and 16th-century Florentine republic. However, little detail is known with certainty about his private life, and no mention of his sexuality has been found in the Florentine archives (in terms of denunciations) [8] albeit which during this period are incomplete. [9]
Magdalene Penitent (c. 1455) – Museo dell’Opera del Duomo, Florence.

Where can donatello artwork be found
Within the museum you will also find Donatello’s Penitent Magdalene, a wood carving finished in the later years of his life. In direct contrast with the popular depiction of Mary Magdalene, he chose to show her in a ragged and emancipated state after 30 years of solitude and penitence in the desert. According to art historian Giorgio Vasari, it has “no flaws and a perfect anatomy” but, I encourage you to see it for yourself, the detail is mesmerizing.
St. Louis of Toulouse, now in the Museum of the Basilica di Santa Croce, was within the classical frame (also by Donatello) that now houses the Incredulity of St. Thomas by Verrocchio around the corner along Via Calzaiouoli.

References:

http://www.biography.com/artist/donatello
http://www.britannica.com/biography/Donatello
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donatello
http://www.visitflorence.com/itineraries-in-florence/donatello-in-florence.html
http://www.travelingintuscany.com/art/donatello.htm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *