where is the starry night painting on exhisit

Where is the starry night painting on exhisit
Surprises abounded at the first press preview for the new MoMA, including the shock-install of Faith Ringgold’s mural-sized American People Series #20: Die (1967) next to Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907).
A small glitch is causing an outsize problem for the famed painting. Call it “Hairy Night”?

Every continent, with the exception of Antarctica, has Van Gogh works on display for the public to view. For the largest collection of Van Gogh works, head to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam where you will see over 200 of his paintings including The Potato Eaters, Almond Blossom, Wheatfield with Crows, self-portraits, plus many of his drawings and letters. While in The Netherlands, be sure to stop in at the Kröller-Müller Museum to see The Café Terrace on the Place du Forum, Arles, at Night as well as a fine selection of other pieces by Van Gogh. Or, perhaps you want to see his most famous painting The Starry Night; it is located in the Museum of Modern Art in New York. For the locations of all of Van Gogh’s most famous works, see our list of museums and locate the Van Gogh’s nearest to you.
During Van Gogh’s time, his work was not recognized as it is today. In fact, he only sold one painting during his lifetime The Red Vineyard; today this painting is located at the Pushkin Museum in Moscow. It was only after his death that Vincent’s sister-in-law Johanna van Gogh-Bonger collected his works and began to donate them for exhibition. Although a few of his works were destroyed in fires, and a few are in locations unknown today, it is incredible how many are on display today for us to view.

Some people have made stylistic comparisons to Vincent’s other well known and equally turbulent work Wheatfield with Crows. Does the tumultuous style of these works reflect a tortured mind? Or is there something more we can read within the whorls Vincent’s raging night sky? This is what makes Starry Night not only Vincent’s most famous work, but also one of its most frequently interpreted in terms of its meaning and importance.
While there’s no denying the popularity of Starry Night, it’s also interesting to note that there is very little known about Vincent’s own feelings toward his work. This is mainly due to the fact that he only mentions it in his letters to Theo twice (Letters 595 and 607), and then only in passing. In his correspondence with his brother, Vincent would often discuss specific works in great detail, but not so in the case of Starry Night. Why? It’s difficult to say.

Where is the starry night painting on exhisit
The painting was investigated by the scientists at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. [83] The pigment analysis has shown that the sky was painted with ultramarine and cobalt blue and for the stars and the Moon Van Gogh employed the rare pigment indian yellow together with zinc yellow. [84]
He wrote about existing in another dimension after death and associated this dimension with the night sky. “It would be so simple and would account so much for the terrible things in life, which now amaze and wound us so, if life had yet another hemisphere, invisible it is true, but where one lands when one dies.” [41] “Hope is in the stars,” he wrote, but he was quick to point out that “earth is a planet too, and consequently a star, or celestial orb.” [36] And he stated flatly that The Starry Night was “not a return to the romantic or to religious ideas.” [42]

Van Gogh assigned an emotional language to night and nature that took them far from their actual appearances. Dominated by vivid blues and yellows applied with gestural verve and immediacy, The Starry Night also demonstrates how inseparable van Gogh’s vision was from the new procedures of painting he had devised, in which color and paint describe a world outside the artwork even as they telegraph their own status as, merely, color and paint.
In creating this image of the night sky—dominated by the bright moon at right and Venus at center left—van Gogh heralded modern painting’s new embrace of mood, expression, symbol, and sentiment. Inspired by the view from his window at the Saint-Paul-de-Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy, in southern France, where the artist spent twelve months in 1889–90 seeking reprieve from his mental illnesses, The Starry Night (made in mid-June) is both an exercise in observation and a clear departure from it. The vision took place at night, yet the painting, among hundreds of artworks van Gogh made that year, was created in several sessions during the day, under entirely different atmospheric conditions. The picturesque village nestled below the hills was based on other views—it could not be seen from his window—and the cypress at left appears much closer than it was. And although certain features of the sky have been reconstructed as observed, the artist altered celestial shapes and added a sense of glow.

References:

http://www.vangoghgallery.com/museum/
http://www.vggallery.com/painting/p_0612.htm
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Starry_Night
http://www.moma.org/collection/works/79802
http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en/organisation/conditions-use-and-permissions-of-images

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