where is the starry night

Where is the starry night
The painting was investigated by the scientists at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. [83] The pigment analysis has shown that the sky was painted with ultramarine and cobalt blue and for the stars and the Moon Van Gogh employed the rare pigment indian yellow together with zinc yellow. [84]
Although The Starry Night was painted during the day in Van Gogh’s ground-floor studio, it would be inaccurate to state that the picture was painted from memory. The view has been identified as the one from his bedroom window, facing east, [1] [2] [16] [17] a view which Van Gogh painted variations of no fewer than twenty-one times, [ citation needed ] including The Starry Night. “Through the iron-barred window,” he wrote to his brother, Theo, around 23 May 1889, “I can see an enclosed square of wheat . . . above which, in the morning, I watch the sun rise in all its glory.” [2] [L 2]

Van Gogh assigned an emotional language to night and nature that took them far from their actual appearances. Dominated by vivid blues and yellows applied with gestural verve and immediacy, The Starry Night also demonstrates how inseparable van Gogh’s vision was from the new procedures of painting he had devised, in which color and paint describe a world outside the artwork even as they telegraph their own status as, merely, color and paint.
In creating this image of the night sky—dominated by the bright moon at right and Venus at center left—van Gogh heralded modern painting’s new embrace of mood, expression, symbol, and sentiment. Inspired by the view from his window at the Saint-Paul-de-Mausole asylum in Saint-Rémy, in southern France, where the artist spent twelve months in 1889–90 seeking reprieve from his mental illnesses, The Starry Night (made in mid-June) is both an exercise in observation and a clear departure from it. The vision took place at night, yet the painting, among hundreds of artworks van Gogh made that year, was created in several sessions during the day, under entirely different atmospheric conditions. The picturesque village nestled below the hills was based on other views—it could not be seen from his window—and the cypress at left appears much closer than it was. And although certain features of the sky have been reconstructed as observed, the artist altered celestial shapes and added a sense of glow.

Where is the starry night
3) The artist considered “The Starry Night,” which one day would rank among his most famous works, to be a failure, according to what he wrote to his brother.
There had been hills in Arles too, of course. But they entered his panoramic scenes as idyllic touches. His landscapes included the harvest, passing trains, isolated farmsteads and distant towns; and the hills were simply one more detail. In Arles, van Gogh’s dream had been of the harmony of things and of the spatial dimensions in which that harmony could be felt. None of that remained. The hills rose up steep and abruptly now, menacing, threatening to drag the lonesome soul down into vertiginous depths.

Where is the starry night
With its seductive swirls, intoxicating composition, and enchanting color palette, Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night is one of the world’s most beloved and well-known works of art. In its creation and eventual success, there’s much more to this Starry Night than you might have known.
The one known for sure to have been sold was the far lesser known The Red Vineyard at Arles, which was completed in November 1888, before the breakdown that sent him to the asylum. Belgian artist and collector Anna Boch purchased it for 400 francs at the Les XX exhibition in 1890. Today this historic painting is on display at the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow. But there is evidence that van Gogh sold a second painting. In his biography of the artist, historian Marc Edo Tralbaut talked about a letter from Theo saying one of van Gogh’s self portraits found its way to a London art dealer.

Where is the starry night
What I got in response was a series of auto-replies from members of the MoMA press team saying they were “working around the clock to respond to an exceptionally high volume of press requests.”
On Thursday, the Museum of Modern Art opened its doors to the press corps after a months-long closure, letting reporters see the fruits of a $400 million renovation and expansion. It was a kind gesture to the reporting class, especially considering MoMA members won’t see the redesigned digs until next week. (It opens to the public on October 21.)

References:

http://www.moma.org/collection/works/79802
http://www.vincentvangogh.org/starry-night.jsp
http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/62621/11-things-you-didnt-know-about-starry-night
http://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/moma-starry-night-hair-1676053
http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/62621/11-things-you-didnt-know-about-starry-night

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