which of the following pairs are the central figures in raphaels school of athens

Which of the following pairs are the central figures in raphaels school of athens
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Discussion Board 8A humn1101.docx

Who is the author of The Canterbury Tales?
Which of the following is NOT included among the pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales?

Which of the following pairs are the central figures in raphaels school of athens
R Raphael as Apelles (Απελλής) (c. 370 – c. 310 BC)
Probably the most provocative part of the School of Athens, Raphael in the center (on the right side Sodoma) is seen among the greatest minds, like Alfred Hitchcock in his films. Why did the Pope accept this?

Which of the following pairs are the central figures in raphaels school of athens
To answer the following questions about this famous painting you should study the Image Gallery and then read the following article from Wikipedia.
The School of Athens, or Scuola di Atene in Italian, is one of the most famous frescoes by the Italian Renaissance artist Raphael. It was painted between 1509 and 1510 as a part of Raphael’s commission to decorate with frescoes the rooms now known as the Stanze di Raffaello , in the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican. The Stanza della Segnatura was the first of the rooms to be decorated, and The School of Athens, representing Philosophy, was probably the second painting to be finished there, [ 1 ] after La Disputa (Theology) on the opposite wall, and the Parnassus (Literature). The picture has long been seen as “Raphael’s masterpiece and the perfect embodiment of the classical spirit of the High Renaissance.” [ 2 ]

Which of the following pairs are the central figures in raphaels school of athens
Art historians have posited identification of many other scholars and thinkers that you’ll recognize. On the viewer’s right, the same side as Aristotle, is a group of men who subscribed to Aristotle’s dedication to logic and structure. Euclid, the mathematician who made geometry accessible, is leaning over a slate and constructing a figure with a compass. The man next to him wearing a distinctive crown and holding a terrestrial globe is claimed to be Ptolemy of Alexandria, the first geographer to delineate the world using latitude and longitude (not the similarly named ruler of Egypt). The man holding the celestial globe was identified as Zoroaster by groundbreaking art historian Giorgio Vasari, but modern scholars agree that Zoroaster would be very out of place in this painting since he was not Athenian, Greek, or a philosopher. Instead, this figure is now identified as Strabo, another geographer who dedicated his studies to the interconnection of terrestrial and celestial phenomena.
You’ve definitely seen this painting before, but if you haven’t taken the opportunity to study it closely, you’ve also definitely missed some details. Commissioned by Pope Julius II to adorn his private library in the Vatican’s Stanza della Segnatura (The Signature Room, a reference to the official documents signed by the Pope there), Raphael painted the fresco around 1510 AD, during the height of the Renaissance’s fascination with Classical philosophy. There are 58 representations of real historical thinkers in Raphael’s School of Athens, few of which have completely undisputed identities but all of which are composed with great care.

References:

http://www.studyblue.com/notes/note/n/humanities-1010-final/deck/15957921
http://www.hellenicaworld.com/Greece/Science/en/SchoolAthens.html
http://agrega.juntadeandalucia.es/repositorio/07072016/cd/es-an_2016070712_9134629/Greek%20Philosophi_HTML/school_of_athens.html
http://oudonquijote.wordpress.com/2013/09/23/raphaels-school-of-athens-alyssa-boutelle/
http://blogs.cuit.columbia.edu/maf2219/the-italian-renaissance-2/

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