who helped raphael with the architectural elements in the fresco philosophy (school of athens)

Who helped raphael with the architectural elements in the fresco philosophy (school of athens)
On the left, cloaked in an olive mantle, is Socrates, arguing in a group that includes Chrysippus, Xenophon, Aeschines and Alcibiades. Facing the venerable Venetian scientist Zeno, is Epicurus, crowned with grape leaves, presumably defending the principle of hedonism. Attentively followed by his pupils (including the turbanned Averroes) Pythagoras teaches the diatesseron from a book. In strong contrast in front of him is Xenocrates (others say Parmenides). In the foreground, head resting on his arm, the mournful Heracleitus (with the features of Michelangelo). The absence of this figure in the original cartoon (now in Milan’s Ambrosian Library) and its obvious Michelangelo style (it is modelled on the Sybils and Ignudi of the Sistine ceiling), leads us to believe that Raphael added this figure in 1511 when, after completing the room, he saw the first half of the Sistine Chapel Ceiling frescoes. In tribute to his great rival, Raphael portrayed Michelangelo in the guise of the philosopher from Ephesus. The child at the side of Epicurus, clearly indifferent to the speculations of the thinkers, seems to be Federico Gonzaga (1500-40), later Federico II of Mantua of the famous Gonzaga family of Renaissance patrons and collectors. The passer-by in white translucent toga and da Vinci smile, is supposedly Francesco Maria Della Rovere (1490-1538), nephew of Julius II and later Duke of Urbino.
For the meaning of other masterpieces, see: Famous Paintings Analyzed.

Who helped raphael with the architectural elements in the fresco philosophy (school of athens)
Among the crowd surrounding Socrates are his students, including the general Alcibiades and Aeschines of Sphettus.
Scholars argue that this divide in philosophies, placed at the center of The School of Athens, is the core theme of the painting.

Who helped raphael with the architectural elements in the fresco philosophy (school of athens)
In the center of the fresco, at its architecture’s central vanishing point, are the two undisputed main subjects: Plato on the left and Aristotle, his student, on the right. Both figures hold modern (of the time), bound copies of their books in their left hands, while gesturing with their right. Plato holds Timaeus and Aristotle holds his Nicomachean Ethics. Plato is depicted as old, grey, and bare-foot. By contrast, Aristotle, slightly ahead of him, is in mature manhood, wearing sandals and gold-trimmed robes, and the youth about them seem to look his way. In addition, these two central figures gesture along different dimensions: Plato vertically, upward along the picture-plane, into the vault above; Aristotle on the horizontal plane at right-angles to the picture-plane (hence in strong foreshortening), initiating a flow of space toward viewers.
It is popularly thought that their gestures indicate central aspects of their philosophies, for Plato, his Theory of Forms, and for Aristotle, an emphasis on concrete particulars. Many interpret the painting to show a divergence of the two philosophical schools. Plato argues a sense of timelessness whilst Aristotle looks into the physicality of life and the present realm.

Who helped raphael with the architectural elements in the fresco philosophy (school of athens)
QUESTIONS:
The identities of some of the philosophers in the picture, such as Plato or Aristotle, are certain. Beyond that, identifications of Raphael’s figures have always been hypothetical. To complicate matters, beginning from Vasari’s efforts, some have received multiple identifications, not only as ancients but also as figures contemporary with Raphael. [ 10 ]

Who helped raphael with the architectural elements in the fresco philosophy (school of athens)
Raphael was one of the three greatest masters of the High Renaissance, the brief period between 1500 and 1530, the heyday of early capitalist art in Italy. First beginnings of capitalist production arose in the 14th and 15th centuries in Florence and Genoa. Artisanship and banking flourished in the cities of northern and central Italy until the 15th century. Wealth and luxury expanded, and the power-seeking ruling classes gave the arts great representative and decorative tasks in pursuit of their own importance.
Raphael is one of the great discoverers of the feminine in painting. His lifelong preoccupation with the Madonna guided him to this subject, the love between human mother and child. Indeed, one might say that ancient mother cults live on in this theme.

References:

http://mymodernmet.com/school-of-athens-raphael/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_School_of_Athens
http://agrega.juntadeandalucia.es/repositorio/07072016/cd/es-an_2016070712_9134629/Greek%20Philosophi_HTML/school_of_athens.html
http://www.peoplesworld.org/article/raphael-italian-painter-and-architect-high-renaissance-harbinger-of-modernity/
http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/famous-paintings/school-of-athens.htm

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